CURRENT CALL FOR PAPERS

Together

Fall 2019 Special Issue

Guest Editors:
Ujju Aggarwal, The New School
Linta Varghese, Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY
Rupal Oza, Hunter College, CUNY

Priority Deadline: September 15, 2018

In recent years, a diverse range of actors have emphasized the need to come together, to join forces and mobilize against/in the context of escalating ecological disaster, permanent war and empire, violence against women, growing economic precarity, the prison industrial complex, and heightened state-sanctioned racism and xenophobia (for example, the Women’s March, #MeToo, the Poor People’s Campaign, #BlackLivesMatter, trans justice, sanctuary, global anti-austerity movements, the International Women’s Strike, and BDS, among others). Many of these calls align with long traditions of organizing against the gendered dimension of local and global forms of structural violence that have included Black Freedom struggles, anti-colonial struggles, and struggles against settler colonialism.

On one hand, calls to come together can expand our political horizons by foregrounding the relationality of struggle that moves us beyond single issues and allyship. Indeed, unlikely, subversive alliances have disrupted power relations and in doing so, expanded liberatory paths and political futures. However, appeals to come together can also do the opposite, and re-entrench structures and logics that require differentiation. For example, as critical race theorists and scholars who challenge the limits of reformist reform demonstrate, efforts that claim to contest structured inequalities through a joining of mutual interests are often circumscribed by their failure to transform the foundations that have produced these injustices (Bell 1980; Gilmore and Gilmore 2008; Loyd, Mitchelson, and Burridge 2013; Berger, Kaba, and Stein 2017). Likewise, feminist theory calls attention to the contradictory nature of collective action that does not transform power as well as the significance of situated knowledge, the limits of intention, and the centrality of engaging difference in confronting structured inequities (Alexander 1994; Boris 1989; Collins 2002; Crenshaw 1991; Lorde 1984; Sunder Rajan 2003).

In this issue, we seek to build upon and continue earlier conversations in WSQ taken up in the special issues Engage (2013) and Solidarity (2014). We invite contributions that engage feminist theory to reflect on long-standing debates and theorizations about the limitations and possibilities of coming together by addressing the following questions: What historical formations can we draw from, and what legacies of struggle might enliven contemporary struggles? What assumptions of similarities, subject positions, and exclusions do calls to come together rely upon; and as Roediger notes, how do we make solidarity uneasy (2016)?  What might examining efforts and appeals to come together through transfeminist critiques, Indigenous feminisms, Marxist feminism, third world feminism, and/or U.S. women of color feminism illuminate about specific political conjunctures? What subjectivities, affective registers, affinities, political formations, and temporalities are imbricated in calls to come together? What determines the possibilities or the limits of coalition or solidarity to enliven liberatory futures?

Submissions can be from across disciplines, located in various historical moments and geographies and can include academic research essays, creative prose, fiction, and poetry. Academic research essays should engage feminist theory as well as gender and: racialization, racial capitalism, critical race theory, critical disability studies, queer of color critique, and/or political economy (among other approaches). 

In thinking through a feminist lens about the limitations and possibilities of coming together, suggested topics of research essays, creative prose, fiction, and poetry can include the following topics:

  • Genealogies, theories and political strategies of “coming together” (safe space, coalition, consciousness raising, protests, strikes, etc.)          
  • Formations of together (decentralization, centralization, horizontalism, self-reliance, self-determination)
  • Crossing borders (urban-rural, transnational, border walls, infrastructure)
  • “Conscious capitalism” (social entrepreneurialism, microfinance, social impact investment, green capitalism, carbon exchange, ethical commodity chains)
  • Work and labor (reproductive labor, disability justice)
  • Economies (sharing economy, cooperatives, participatory budgeting, moral economies)
  • Public space, public infrastructures, anti-privatization movements, and the commons
  • Abolition
  • Militant particularism vs. the limitations of the “local”
  • Fighting to win vs. “winnability” in U.S., transnational or non-U.S. social movements
  • Gender and crises: policing, production, impact (refugee crisis, climate change and environmental disaster, national and global security states, financial crisis)
  • Institutional formations (workplaces, schools, health centers, community organizations)
  • Narratives and representations of coming together in literature and media
  • Theories and strategies as well as affective appeals of coming together (“family,” kinship, diaspora, ethno-nationalism, pan-ethnicity)
  • Internationalism (transregional and international movements, BDS, anti-austerity movements, anti-corruption/transparency, humanitarianism, pinkwashing, anti-fascism)
  • Feminisms:  U.S. third world feminisms, U.S. women of color feminisms, transnational feminisms, transfeminisms
  • Revolutionary nationalist and anti-colonial movements
  • Migration and mobility, immigrant rights, sanctuary, expanded sanctuary, undocuQueer; DREAMers

 

SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS

PRIORITY DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 15, 2018

www.feministpress.org/submission-guidelines

Scholarly articles and inquiries should be sent to guest issue editors Ujju Aggarwal, Linta Varghese, and Rupal Oza at WSQTogether@gmail.com. We will give priority consideration to submissions received by September 15, 2018. Please send complete articles, not abstracts. Submissions should not exceed 6,360 words (including abstract, keywords, un-embedded notes, captions, and works cited) and should comply with the Feminist Press’s formatting guidelines. Please send complete articles, not abstracts. We prefer Microsoft Word file formats. Please provide all contact information in the body of the e-mail. We do not accept work that has been previously published or under review at another journal.

Poetry submissions related to the issue theme should be sent to WSQ’s poetry editor Patricia Smith at WSQpoetry@gmail.com by September 15, 2018. Please review previous issues of WSQ to see what type of submissions we prefer before submitting poems. Please note that poetry submissions may be held for six months or longer. Simultaneous submissions are acceptable if the poetry editor is notified immediately of acceptance elsewhere. We do not accept work that has been previously published. Please paste poetry submissions into the body of the e-mail along with all contact information.

Fiction, essay, memoir, and translation submissions related to the issue theme between 2000–2500 words should be sent to WSQ's fiction/nonfiction editor, Rosalie Morales Kearns, at WSQCreativeProse@gmail.com by September 15, 2018. Please review previous issues of WSQ to see what type of submissions we prefer before submitting prose. Please note that prose submissions may be held for six months or longer. Simultaneous submissions are acceptable if the prose editor is notified immediately of acceptance elsewhere. We do not accept work that has been previously published. Please provide all contact information in the body of the e-mail.

 

ABOUT WSQ: Since 1972, WSQ has been an interdisciplinary forum for the exchange of emerging perspectives on women, gender, and sexuality. Its peer-reviewed interdisciplinary thematic issues focus on such topics as Precarious Work, At Sea, Solidarity, Queer Methods, Child, Activisms, The Global and the Intimate, Trans-,The Sexual Body, and Mother, combining legal, queer, cultural, technological, and historical work to present the most exciting new scholarship, fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, book reviews, and visual arts on ideas that engage popular and academic readers alike. WSQ is edited by Jillian Báez (College of Staten Island-CUNY) and Natalie Havlin (LaGuardia Community College-CUNY) and published by the Feminist Press at the City University of New York. Visit http://www.feministpress.org/wsq