Eat My Heart Out

Eat My Heart Out

12.57 17.95

Zoe Pilger
"A foul-mouthed Nancy Mitford for the Gawker generation."

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Paperback Edition
ISBN: 
9781558618855
Publication Date: 05-05-2015

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Half-liberated, half-drunk, Ann-Marie is twenty-three, broke, and convinced that love—sweet love!—is the answer to all of her problems. Then she meets legendary second wave feminist Stephanie Haight, who becomes obsessed with the idea that she can save Ann-Marie and her entire generation. From Little Mermaid-themed warehouse parties and ritual worship ceremonies summoning ancient goddesses to disastrous one-night stands with strikingly unsuitable men, Ann-Marie hurtles through London and life. Fiercely clever and unapologetically wild, Eat My Heart Out is the satire for our narcissistic, hedonistic, post-postfeminist era.

"With this electric romp of a novel, Pilger turns a neon light on to the intersection of romantic love and feminism." —Publishers Weekly

"Craving whatever she hasn't got and detesting whatever she has, Zoe Pilger's brilliant and psychically bulimic narrator is everyone's anti-Bridget Jones. An awareness of the pathology of romantic love, and a terror of what lies in its absence, lies at the heart of this brutally funny book." —Chris Kraus, author of I Love Dick

"Protagonist Ann-Marie wanders through London's glittery underground of Bright Young Artists, concussed by life itself. Pilger's love story fictionalizes her contexts so extremely that every adolescent romance—with art, feminism, even that gross dude she had a one night stand with—is only a deceptive form mobilized to assault neutered authority. A masochistic siren song—100 percent more awesome than The Little Mermaid." —Trisha Low, author of The Compleat Purge

"Super-smart, funny and dark as midnight." —Marie Claire UK

"An unflinching account of post-feminist urban life. Satirical, snarky and wildly entertaining." —Observer

"Brilliantly odd, very funny." —Financial Times

"Perfectly pitched satire." —New Statesman